Kathmandu Valley, the capital and heart of the country essentially symbolizes all that is Nepal. Katmandu Durbar Square where you will visit Hanuman Dhoka, the old and historic palace of Kathmandu named after monkey God, Hanuman. It is historic seat of royalty.Within the walking distance you will find the tall temple of Taleju from 1549 AD, the large stone statue of Kal Bhairav, the God of destruction,. the Big Bell and Big Drum and Hindu Lord Shiva and his consort Parvati peeping from window. Visit the temple of Kumari, the residence of Living Goddess within the vicinity. Kumari means the virgin girl. The girl is selected from Buddhist family. The building has profusely carved wooden balconies and window screen. Next a very interesting temple is Kasthamandap which is believed to be built from a single tree trunk and the name Katmandu is derived from this temple.



Perched on a hilltop on the south western part of Kathmandu, Swayambhunath is one of the most important religious and cultural sites in Nepal and is associated with the birth of the Kathmandu Valley civilization. Approximately 2000 years old, Swayambhunath stupa, is a dome 20 meters in diameter and 32 meters high and is made of brick and earth mounted by a conical spire capped by a pinnacle of copper gilt. It is surrounded by many other smaller temples and places of religious importance for both Hindus and Buddhists, a perfect example of the symbiotic co-existence of different religious beliefs only found in Nepal. The hill is heavily wooded on all sides with indigenous plant species, and troops of monkeys, giving it the nick name of Monkey Temple. The height of Swayambhunath also makes it a good vantage point and on clear sunny days one can see the Himalayas all the way to the east.




One of the three main cities in the Valley, Bhaktapur is located east of Kathmandu and is in reality a medieval city where the Newars, the main inhabitants still follow age old traditions and customs. Established around the 9th century Bhaktapur is known for its fertile land and was still a small farming village when Patan and Kathmandu were already well established towns. Bhaktapur became the capital of the Valley in 1377 BC during the reign of the Malla dynasty and flourished as a major urban centre from the 15th century onwards. It houses some of the best examples of Nepali craftsmanship on wood and stone such as the Palace of 55 Windows built in 1697, the five storied Nyatapola Temple, the KashiBiswanath Temple, and the Dattatreya Temple among many others. Considered a living museum one can witness ancient traditions carried out even today as they were centuries ago in many areas of the city such as in Potters Square where the local potters use age old techniques to make clay utensils. Bhaktapur is also among the seven Monument Zones that make the Kathmandu Valley World Heritage Sites.



Pokhara is situated in the northwestern corner of the Pokhara Valley, which is a widening of the Seti Gandaki valley. The climate is sub-tropical but due to the elevation the temperatures are moderate: the summer temperatures average between 25-35 C, in winter around -2-15 C. In the south the city borders on Phewa Tal (lake) (4.4 km at an elevation of about 800 m above sea level), in the north at an elevation of around 1,000 m the outskirts of the city touch the base of the Annapurna mountain range. From the southern fringes of the city 3 eight-thousanders (Dhaulagiri, Annapurna, Manaslu) and, in the middle of the Annapurna range, the Machapuchare ('Fishtail') with close to 7,000 m can be seen. In the south of the city, a tributary of the Seti coming from Phewa Lake disappears at Patale Chhango (Nepali for Hell's Falls, also called Devi's or David's Falls, after someone who supposedly fell into the falls) into an underground gorge, to reappear 500 metres further south.